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Native Offerings Farm
April 28, 2015 at 8:38 am

The organic certification paper work is complete. It will go out with todays mail to NOFA-NY.

Native Offerings Farm
Facebook IconApril 25, 2015 at 1:10 pm

Big Bossy is our lead cow.

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Sharon Hammond Oh, that big old lovely cow!!!

April 26, 2015 at 9:14 am

Native Offerings Farm
Facebook IconApril 23, 2015 at 1:44 pm

There are vegetables under the row covers under the snow. Hopefully the voles will not find the treasure.

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Native Offerings Farm
Facebook IconApril 21, 2015 at 10:27 am

We beat the rain with the beets

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Native Offerings Farm
Facebook IconApril 20, 2015 at 4:43 pm

Deb graduated from LEAD NY this weekend. Congratulations Deb!

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Amy Melton Prentiss Congratulations!

April 20, 2015 at 6:41 pm

NancySue Lootens Reid Wonderful. Congratulations!

April 20, 2015 at 5:49 pm

Kami Callahan WOOHOO!!!!

April 20, 2015 at 7:18 pm

Pamela Keen Zablonski Congratulations!!

April 20, 2015 at 5:11 pm

Todd Chinchen Awesome Lady

April 20, 2015 at 7:36 pm

Dawn Cox Congrats and nice work, Deb 🎉

April 20, 2015 at 11:08 pm

Dick DuBois Congratulations Deb!!

April 20, 2015 at 10:04 pm

Sharon Hammond Lovely picture and congratulations!

April 20, 2015 at 7:37 pm

Sherry Lehning WOOO HOOOOO !! CONGRATS D E B !!

April 20, 2015 at 4:52 pm

Native Offerings Farm
Facebook IconApril 19, 2015 at 8:35 pm

Seeds are in the ground. The first planting is complete. Soon little arugulas, cilantros and many other tasty vegetables will emerge from the cold soil.
We also put some transplants in. Spinach and Rainbow Chard seedlings are in the ground waiting for rain.

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Native Offerings Farm We just put out hardy plants. We will also cover them with row cover once the wind slows down. I would not put onions out.

April 20, 2015 at 4:10 pm

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Samantha Crocker Is that ok? The temps are supposed to go down so far I was afraid to do ours!

April 20, 2015 at 4:00 pm

We buy our cattle from reputable dealer who knows what kind of animals we want. They are all brucellosis free and healthy when they arrive on our farm. All spring, summer and some of the fall, the cattle are pastured on a diverse mix of pasture grasses. In the winter the cattle are kept in our yard so that our fields are protected from the impact of their hooves. They are fed our own hay and sometimes, balage when the weather is really cold. We don’t feed our cattle grain, and so they don’t receive antibiotics, hormones or animal by-products in their feed. We use the manure and bedding from the yard as compost that is spread throughout the farm to balance the soil with organic matter. Because our cattle are raised completely on grass they are lean and have a delicious rich beef flavor. You can find more information about the advantages of grass fed meat from Jo Robinson’s web sitewww.eatwild.com. When cooking grass fed beef it is best to cook it slowly and at low temperatures, as the high heat will toughen the protein.

To order a quarter (or more) beef from us contact us to check on availability. We take a $20 deposit for each 1/4 you order at the time of ordering. This deposit places your order.

The beef should be generally ready for butchering in the winter months.

You can expect about 75-90lbs of meat (for a quarter order) to put into your freezer. You will need about 5-7 cubic feet of freezer space to store your ¼ order. You are charged on the hanging weight, which for a quarter is about 125-160lb. (What you can expect to take home is about 40% less than the hanging weight due to trimming and de-boning.) You also pay the butcher for their services which adds about $0.30/lb. (some unusual cutting instruction and cyrovac involve additional costs). Our butcher, McDonald’s Meats in Girard, PA. will cut your order and we will pick it up from them and bring your order back to our farm. It is approximately 10-15 days after butcher that your order will be ready. We’ll arrange with you a date when you can pick your order up from the farm. We’ll invoice you by mail based on the animals hanging weight. Our cow sizes and weights are variable, expected poundage is approximate. Quantities vary according to how you specify your butchering and how large or small the cow is. Here’s a very approximate breakdown of quantities for a quarter cow.

Click for diagram of cuts

Click for diagram of cuts

Steaks:
Steaks are cut at 1″ and are packaged two to a package
4-6 t-bone steaks
4-6 ribeye steaks
2 sirloin steaks
6-8 cubed steaks from the top round roast

Roasts:
about 8, 2″ chuck roasts
1 rump roast
1 bottom round roast
1 sirloin tip
1 sirloin roast
1/2 beef brisket

Other:
approximately 20 lbs. of ground beef
1 bag of bones
2 shank
Short ribs
Organs available by request

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