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Heather A Wilson
February 27, 2015 at 7:17 pm

Are you going to be at Horsefeathers tomorrow? Do you by any chance sell some of your fermented veggies or is that only for the share? I have to go on antibiotics and would love some!

Native Offerings Farm
February 16, 2015 at 11:10 am

It was so cold at the farm today that the thermometer bottomed out at -25F. I am glad that we do not have distributions scheduled for this week. It is a good time for a vacation. We will return for the last winter distribution in March.

Native Offerings Farm
February 3, 2015 at 3:25 pm

The apple delivery to Orchard Park is delayed until after 5pm.

Native Offerings Farm
February 3, 2015 at 9:24 am

We will be having our only February distributions this week.

Lauren Bee Sorry to be redundant, so there arent any share pickups this week? Are we done for the season? I wasn't there last pick up so I didnt get to find out or talk to anyone.

February 15, 2015 at 5:36 pm

Native Offerings Farm There is not a share this week which worked out well because we would have ended up delivering frozen vegetables.

February 15, 2015 at 5:39 pm

1

Native Offerings Farm We will have our last winter share during the second week of March.

February 15, 2015 at 5:40 pm

1

Lauren Bee Thank you:)

February 15, 2015 at 8:02 pm

Kristina Church
January 30, 2015 at 8:56 pm

Thanks for the fantastic kim chi this season! We had kim chi noodle soup with egg tonight, and it nourished my very soul! We crave it when the weather gets cold. Wonderful stuff!

Native Offerings Farm
January 30, 2015 at 3:12 pm

This is a true story. A customer approaches the "farmer" at the farmers market and asks if he sprays. The "farmer" responds no which is true since the spraying is not his job. Herbicides, fungicides and pesticides are sprayed on the farm by someone else. We can not advertise that we are organic unless we are certified and there is a reason for this. It is to preserve the integrity of the word ORGANIC.
This is one of the reasons we are in the process of certifying the farm organic. Another is that our previous certifying agent, Certified Naturally Grown, is unknown to almost everyone. What does naturally grown mean anyway? Everything is natural these days it seems. The word has been corrupted. stew

Amy Melton Prentiss Thanks for the education, Stew.

January 30, 2015 at 3:13 pm

1

NancySue Lootens Reid Yes. So true!

January 30, 2015 at 3:25 pm

Biscotti for Everybotti You produce fantastic delicious produce!

January 30, 2015 at 6:29 pm

3

Rachel Cherry Myers Yay!!!! Let me know if you guys have any questions!!!!

February 1, 2015 at 7:42 am

Native Offerings Farm That would be great. Thanks!

February 1, 2015 at 9:15 pm

We buy our cattle from reputable dealer who knows what kind of animals we want. They are all brucellosis free and healthy when they arrive on our farm. All spring, summer and some of the fall, the cattle are pastured on a diverse mix of pasture grasses. In the winter the cattle are kept in our yard so that our fields are protected from the impact of their hooves. They are fed our own hay and sometimes, balage when the weather is really cold. We don’t feed our cattle grain, and so they don’t receive antibiotics, hormones or animal by-products in their feed. We use the manure and bedding from the yard as compost that is spread throughout the farm to balance the soil with organic matter. Because our cattle are raised completely on grass they are lean and have a delicious rich beef flavor. You can find more information about the advantages of grass fed meat from Jo Robinson’s web sitewww.eatwild.com. When cooking grass fed beef it is best to cook it slowly and at low temperatures, as the high heat will toughen the protein.

To order a quarter (or more) beef from us contact us to check on availability. We take a $20 deposit for each 1/4 you order at the time of ordering. This deposit places your order.

The beef should be generally ready for butchering in the winter months.

You can expect about 75-90lbs of meat (for a quarter order) to put into your freezer. You will need about 30-40 cubic feet of freezer space to store your ¼ order. You are charged on the hanging weight, which for a quarter is about 125-160lb. (What you can expect to take home is about 40% less than the hanging weight due to trimming and de-boning.) You also pay the butcher for their services which adds about $0.30/lb. (some unusual cutting instruction and cyrovac involve additional costs). Our butcher, McDonald’s Meats in Girard, PA. will cut your order and we will pick it up from them and bring your order back to our farm. It is approximately 10-15 days after butcher that your order will be ready. We’ll arrange with you a date when you can pick your order up from the farm. We’ll invoice you by mail based on the animals hanging weight. Our cow sizes and weights are variable, expected poundage is approximate. Quantities vary according to how you specify your butchering and how large or small the cow is. Here’s a very approximate breakdown of quantities for a quarter cow.

Click for diagram of cuts

Click for diagram of cuts

Steaks:
Steaks are cut at 1″ and are packaged two to a package
4-6 t-bone steaks
4-6 ribeye steaks
2 sirloin steaks
6-8 cubed steaks from the top round roast

Roasts:
about 8, 2″ chuck roasts
1 rump roast
1 bottom round roast
1 sirloin tip
1 sirloin roast
1/2 beef brisket

Other:
approximately 20 lbs. of ground beef
1 bag of bones
2 shank
Short ribs
Organs available by request

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